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Can't We Stop Racism?

Julia Hristov ('24)

ISSUE SPOTLIGHT

 Religion: The Roots of Today's Racism?

LUCIENNE BACON ('22)

In the 1500s, centuries before the coining of the word “racism,” the term race was used to describe certain kinships or groups of people. Its denotation of physical characteristics is attributed to societal development in the latter part of the seventeenth century. There is an established notion that categorization among groups was prevalent in ancient societies—including those of Rome, Greece, and Egypt—before the establishment of the words that would describe this behavior. Existence of these terms is evidence that social division was not new to the world come the Enlightenment and the period of colonization. However, it was this time in history that brought together behavior and ideas about biological inferiority in such a way that a long-lasting justification for slavery and inequality was formed. What must be investigated further is what made society porous to racial policy capable of inciting results that threaten the very definition of our Constitution today. With that question in mind, one must look at the development of the modern world to understand that religion stood at the forefront of human perspective.

It is with great enthusiasm and pride that we publish this second issue of the Avenues Online literary journal, The Network.

 

The Network was imagined in the fall semester of 2019 by us because of our desire for a student-run publication to share the work Avenues Online students have completed inside and outside the virtual classroom—including audiovisual, written, and artistic works—during each semester. We wanted to highlight the amazing talents, sincere hopes, deep thoughts, big ideas, and powerful perspectives of Avenues Online students. With the help and encouragement of our faculty advisor, Ms. Amy Rosenberg, AON Curriculum Designer, the inaugural issue was published in May 2020. 

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Julia Hristov ('24)

Talk

Haitian Creole is a fascinating language. It is a vernacular language, a language that is nonstandard to a specific place or region, a mix of the languages spoken by both French conquerors and African slaves between the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. It emerged from the French plantation colony of Saint-Domingue, which today is the country of Haiti. Today, the language reflects both the grammar and vocabulary of French and of Native African languages, such as Ewe, Fon, Yoruba, and Ibo.

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The Healing Dance Project

Imagined by

MS. KARINE PLANTADIT AND

MS. MICHELLE CAMAYA JULIAN

Choreographed and Performed by 

FIONA POTH ('24)

View

Original Art Found in this Issue

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